Papers

Last updated January 2018

 

The Reported Outcomes, Burdens and Experiences (PROBE) Project: development and evaluation of a questionnaire assessing patient reported outcomes in people with haemophilia

Citation: Skinner, M. W., Chai-Adisaksopha, C., Curtis, R., Frick, N., Nichol M., Noone, D., O’Mahony, B., Page, P., Stonebraker, J. S. and Iorio, A. (2018). The Patient Reported Outcomes, Burdens and Experiences (PROBE) Project: development and evaluation of a questionnaire assessing patient reported outcomes in people with haemophilia. Pilot and Feasibility Studies, 2018 4:58. doi: 10.1186/s40814-018-0253-0

Abstract

Background

The interest of health care agencies, private payers and policy makers for patient-reported outcomes (PRO) is continuously increasing. There is a substantial need to improve capacity to collect and interpret relevant PRO data to support implementation of patient-centered research and optimal care in haemophilia. The Patient Reported Outcomes, Burdens and Experiences (PROBE) Project aims to develop a patient-led research network, to develop a standardized questionnaire to gather patient-reported outcomes and to perform a feasibility study of implementing the PROBE questionnaire.

Methods

A pilot questionnaire was developed using focus group methodology. Content and face validity were assessed by a pool of persons living with haemophilia (PWH) and content experts through interactive workshops. The PROBE questionnaire was translated with the forward-backward approach. PROBE recruited national haemophilia patient non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to administer the questionnaire to people with and without haemophilia. PROBE measured the time to complete the questionnaire and gathered feedback on its content and clarity; staff time and cost required to implement the questionnaire were also collected.

Results

The PROBE questionnaire is comprised of four major sections (demographic data, general health problems, haemophilia-related health problems and health-related quality of life using EQ-5D-5L and EQ-VAS). Seventeen NGOs participated in the pilot study of the PROBE Project, recruiting 656 participants. Of these, 71% completed the questionnaire within 15 min, and all participants completed within 30 min. The median total staff and volunteer time required for the NGOs to carry out the study within their country was 9 h (range 2 to 40 h). NGO costs ranged from $22.00 to $543.00 USD per country, with printing and postage being the most commonly reported expenditures.

Conclusions

The PROBE questionnaire assesses patient-important reported outcomes in PWH and control participants, with a demonstrated short completion time. PROBE proved the feasibility to engage diverse patient communities in the structured generation of real-world outcome research at all stages.